Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month

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Developmental disabilities can cause challenges in physical movement, learning, language and behavior. These disabilities are often diagnosed in early development and typically impact day-to-day activities and last throughout a person’s lifetime.


Who Is Affected

Developmental disabilities are found among all ages, genders, ethnicities and socioeconomic levels. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in the United States about 15 percent of children between the ages of 3 – 17 years old have one or more developmental disabilities. Developmental disabilities include attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, fragile x syndrome, hearing loss and intellectual disability. For information and resources, click here.


Living with a Developmental Disability

Individuals with developmental disabilities lead full active lives. Access to support services aid in the success and self-sufficiency of persons with disabilities. For more than 50 years, PRIDE Industries has created opportunities for those often excluded from the labor force – people with disabilities. Instead of disability – we see unique abilities.

Through assessments, career planning, training, placement, on-the-job support, follow-up, and case management provided by PRIDE, individuals with disabilities become contributing community members. More than 3,200 individuals with developmental, and other disabilities work at PRIDE. More than 500 individuals with disabilities have also been placed in community employment.


Help Others

We can all play a role in helping individuals with developmental and other disabilities join the workforce. Through employment, people with disabilities gain a sense of purpose, dignity, inclusion, and lead more self-sufficient lives.

How can you help? Consider ways in which opportunities can be created in your business or organization. Not sure how? Contact us. We’d be happy to help! Send an email to: info@prideindustries.com.


With Gratitude

Happy Thanksgiving message card with pumpkins over yellow leaves

In this time of gratitude and thanks giving, we give thanks to you:

To our customers, friends and supporters who help create opportunity for more than 3,300 people with disabilities, employed at and supported by PRIDE Industries, thank you. We value your support and appreciate your confidence in us, and for this we are especially grateful.

To our business and community partners who employ and help individuals with a wide range of disabilities transition to the workforce, thank you. Every paycheck delivers dignity, self-respect, and the pride of inclusion to those most often excluded from employment.

To the counselors, trainers, recruiters, job coaches, job developers, and countless community resources who pave the path to employment, thank you. Your dedication and talents make life-changing difference to others.

Lastly, but not least, to our employees. Your passion, dedication, and grit have helped PRIDE Industries be the renowned social enterprise it is. When we think about the things we appreciate, we think of you and our work with you on the creation of jobs for people with disabilities. Thank you.

 

From all of us at PRIDE Industries – we wish you a Thanksgiving filled with abundance and bright moments.

Inclusion Works: National Disability Employment Awareness Month

October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). The month-long celebration is themed “Inclusion Works” and places a spotlight on the contributions made by workers with disabilities and educates the public on the value of a diverse workforce.

For 50 years, PRIDE Industries has created jobs for people with disabilities while championing inclusion and a diverse workforce. At PRIDE, we know that inclusion does work and has transformed its mission into countless daily success stories.

Often, with accommodations at work, whether to their workspace, schedule or with the help of assistive technologies, many individuals with disabilities can become or remain gainfully employed. In most cases, hiring people with disabilities is no different than hiring any other job candidate.

By partnering with PRIDE Industries, businesses can leverage its person-centered services including assessments, job skills development, training, placement, transportation, and on-going support to ensure long-term employment success. PRIDE places people in its own business lines and provides support to more than 500 individuals annually in community-based opportunities.

Following are a few examples of individuals with disabilities who found employment success with a little help from PRIDE:

Melissa
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Making positive change is never easy, but with support and guidance, Melissa’s life transformed and she is now living a life she never thought possible.

More about Melissa’s journey, click here.

 
 

Alice
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“To me, we all have a disability; the only difference is you can physically see mine.”

Through PRIDE’s job coaching services, Alice is celebrating 17 years of working in the community. For more on Alice’s story, click here.

 
 

Derek
pride-industries-_-d-ramsey-_-los-angeles-afbAs a retired veteran, Derek struggled with applying his former skill-set to the civilian workforce.

Through PRIDE Derek found a new career while continuing to serve his military family. More on Derek’s journey, click here.

 
 

Dani
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Job hunting is a difficult process. For a young, first-time job seeker with disabilities, the process can be even more daunting.

Through participation in PRIDE programs and services, Dani is on her way to the future she imagined, “Now I feel like I am becoming more of the adult I want to be.”

For more on Dani’s journey, click here.

 
 


Are you interested in hiring employees with disabilities in your business? Speak to our expert staff by contacting us at info@prideindustries.com.


 

Choose Your Path with PRIDE

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For 50 years PRIDE Industries has been creating jobs for people with disabilities. However, those jobs are not always within PRIDE. Last year, PRIDE’s dedicated employment services team prepared, placed and supported 533 people with disabilities who work in the community either directly for employers, or as part of a supported employment group.  In fact, PRIDE is the largest service provider creating community employment in the state of California.

Creating Community Employment Success

Whether people with disabilities find work within PRIDE or in the community, our job skills training and supports are at the center of their success. When people with disabilities come to PRIDE, they may have worked in the community unsuccessfully, or they may not have every worked.

We begin with a personal assessment to determine what their current skill level is and understand what they believe they would like to do. It’s not quite as simple as filling in the gap between skill and aspiration, however.

Sometimes, people have difficulty envisioning their potential until they start taking small steps toward it. They may have had a negative experience working in the community, or they may not have had any experience at all. So we have to overcome negative perceptions and help people to understand what opportunities do exist. We go to work helping to educate, build hard and soft work skills, and to help people navigate workplace relationships, employer expectation, and even transportation.

But training without opportunity means disappointment in the end. That is why our job developers are working hard every day to build an expansive employer network. These are community employers who understand that the same qualities that help a person rise above their disability are the most sought after in the workplace: resilience, determination, and persistence in pursuit of a goal. We have more than 180 community employers in our network today – and the numbers keep growing.

When people are ready, they can move to community employment in a couple of different ways. They can go directly to work for an employer. We call this ‘individual placement.’ PRIDE finds the employment opportunity, places the individual in the right job, and then ensures that both the employer and their new employee receive the training they need to be successful together.

The other path benefits individuals who are ready to work in the community, but need more support. It is called ‘supported employment.’ Groups of three individuals with disabilities are supported by a job coach who works side-by-side with them to ensure that they continue to receive the training, assistance and mentoring needed to achieve their goals.

With a staff of 14 job developers closely connected to their communities and job coaches who prepare and support employees, PRIDE Industries’ community placement results defy national trends and continue to grow.

Whether an individual with a disability finds fulfillment working with PRIDE, or wants to pursue employment with a community employer, our focus is on skills development, preparation and placement according to their unique needs and dreams.

Community employment is an essential component of our mission to create jobs for people with disabilities. For more information on PRIDE’s person – centered services visit: prideindustries.com/people/people-services/individual-supported-community-employment.

 

Make a difference for individuals with disabilities:

  • Recognize and support businesses that employ individuals with disabilities.
  • Contact PRIDE Industries at info@prideindustries.com to learn how your business can employ individuals with disabilities.

Together we can change lives…one job at a time.

 

Labor Day 2016: Contributions by All

USA flag in a sunset, labor day

Labor Day is a holiday that celebrates the social and economic accomplishments of all workers.  For 50 years, PRIDE Industries has been creating jobs for those most often excluded from employment; people with disabilities. Through our mission, we serve people with a broad range of disabilities – developmental, intellectual, physical, sensory, mental illness and more.

Our goal is to provide an opportunity to all who want to work and can contribute. Through PRIDE’s business enterprises and by partnering with others in the community, individuals with disabilities become contributing members of the community.

At PRIDE, we know that disability does not mean inability and that through employment people with disabilities gain a sense of purpose, dignity, inclusion, and lead more self-sufficient lives.

Together, we can pave the way for a Labor Day, that celebrates the contributions of all American workers – those with and without disabilities.

Happy Labor Day to all.

Independence: An Opportunity for All

American flag outdoors in a meadow on july 4th.

July 4th is Independence Day – a celebration of our nation’s independence. These days, there are many discussions about what constitutes independence and success for people with disabilities. Our programs and services help promote independence and self-reliance of individuals with disabilities.

Through our mission, we serve people with a broad range of disabilities – developmental, intellectual, physical, sensory, mental illness and more. Individuals may be born with a disability or may acquire one through illness or injury – in everyday life, or in combat.

PRIDE supports many definitions of success as unique as the individuals we serve. For some, it is complete freedom from the reliance upon supports and services. For others, it is simply the opportunity to participate and contribute to their community. Meanwhile, the vehicle for accomplishing these unique goals is through employment. An opportunity. A job.

For 50 years, PRIDE’s mission has been creating jobs for people with disabilities. Through our work, we strive to provide opportunities at all skill levels to aid individuals in the achievement of their definition of independence.

Won’t you join PRIDE Industries in creating jobs for people with disabilities?

Contact PRIDE at info@prideindustries.com to learn how your business can employ individuals with disabilities.

From all of us at PRIDE, Happy Independence Day!

In Honor of Our Fallen Heroes

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“And I’m proud to be an American, where at least I know I’m free. And I won’t forget the men who died, who gave that right to me.” ~Lee Greenwood

On Monday, May 30th – Memorial Day – we pause and remember the brave women and men who have made the ultimate sacrifice while protecting our freedom.

At PRIDE Industries, we create jobs for people with disabilities. Our mission includes veterans who return with physical, emotional, and mental scars which create obstacles to employment and self-sufficiency. We also work to provide an opportunity for those who simply have difficulty rejoining the workforce. On this Memorial Day, we welcome our returning veterans and honor our fallen heroes.

Happy Memorial Day to all.

We are Forever Grateful

PRIDE Industries Veterans Day

On Veterans Day, we honor all the men and women who have served in time of peace and war. Today, we salute you acknowledging your contributions and sacrifice to safeguard our freedom and liberties.

At PRIDE Industries, we understand that Veterans may have difficulty adjusting to civilian life. The skills developed in service to one’s country include leadership, teamwork, and adaptability to changing needs. These are qualities valued by any employer.  Still, military jobs do not always translate easily to the civilian workforce. Disability adds another hurdle. Our programs and partnerships help veterans reenter the workforce after their valiant service to our country. We help veterans find their place in the working world, providing the tools needed to ensure their success.

To all  who serve, we say “thank you.” We are forever grateful.

Why Words Matter

Man with a disability laughing with a woman at a cafe

Let’s Talk: Disability Language

October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). We take this opportunity to highlight the many contributions of America’s workers with disabilities and promote a culture of inclusiveness.

One out of five people in America has a disability, making them our nation’s largest “minority.” The group represents all ages, genders, ethnicities, and socioeconomic levels. The likelihood of joining this group is high. Disability can be acquired at birth, in the blink of an eye due to an accident or injury, or acquired from illness or age.

Despite its frequency, many people are still uncomfortable talking about disability. This uncomfortableness contributes to the obstacles that people with disabilities face in obtaining employment or fully integrating with their workforce. The truth is that there are as many preferences about ways to identify a person with a disability as there are individuals. So what is a well-intentioned person to do? When in doubt: ask. We’ll get to that in a minute, but first, let’s talk about two distinct (and oft-debated) approaches to disability language.

Person-First Language (PFL)
People-first language is generally at the heart of our organization’s disability awareness training. The emphasis is on the person – not the disability or condition. Those who support people-first language (PFL) believe that using a diagnosis or condition as a defining characteristic robs the person of the opportunity to define him or herself. PFL was developed to address the stigma often associated with disability. Advocates wanted to reaffirm that disability does not, in fact, lessen one’s personhood. As such, the PFL movement encourages the use of phrases like “person with a disability,” or “person with autism” instead of “disabled person” or “autistic person.”

The disability community is not only large; it is often divided. Increasingly, a second preference is being voiced: Identity-First Language (IFL).

Identity-First Language (IFL)
For those who prefer identity-first language, “disabled person” is a perfectly acceptable way to identify a person. Their belief is that PFL purposefully separates a person from their disability, presuming that disability is something a person should dissociate from to be considered a whole person.

From their perspective, it also implies that “disability” or “disabled” are negative, derogatory words when, for many, disability is just a part of their being or uniqueness. Within the Autistic community, IFL is preferred by many when Autism is considered as a part of a person’s identity. Using IFL language, you would say that someone is “Autistic,” not a “person with autism.” However, even people with IFL preferences draw an important distinction when it comes to the use of a term strictly for its medical definition. You would never refer to a person based on a diagnosis such as “Down syndrome person” or “cerebral palsy person.”

Confused? You are not alone. So what’s a person to do?

JUST ASK.
The debate between PFL and IFL is proof that words do matter. Language, however, is never “one-size-fits-all.” When in doubt, do not assume. Ask the person how they choose to identify.
Words and language are powerful tools. Language, and the meanings we attach to words, have the power to influence, develop, and change attitudes and beliefs. Each person’s use of language and identity are deeply personal. Just ask and respect their choice.

Quick note: Always avoid terms that dis-empower people or have negative meanings like “handicapped,” “wheelchair-bound,” “crippled,” etc. And please, never use the “R” word. The word “retarded” is a highly offensive term for people with intellectual disabilities.

For more information about People-First and Identity-First Language, here are a few more:

Why Person-First Language Doesn’t Always Put the Person First

Describing People with Disabilities

Identity-First Language

Communicating With and About People with Disabilities

National Disability Employment Awareness Month

People with disabilities are four times more likely to face unemployment than the general population. The persistent statistic is not due to lack of desire or ability to work but to a lack of understanding and a shortage of opportunities for people with disabilities. National Disabilities Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM), shines a light on the issue of employment for people with disabilities.

At PRIDE Industries, we focus on abilities rather than disabilities. For 49 years, PRIDE has been creating meaningful opportunities for individuals with obstacles to employment. We serve those who are born with – or acquire a disability – including veterans, and young adults leaving the foster care system. Through training, job skills development, coaching, and placement, we create opportunity daily. The result is changed lives.

PRIDE Industries_ Connie LFor Connie, opportunity meant finding her calling and contributing to something greater than herself. Click here to learn more about Connie.

PRIDE Industries _ Ramon T 02For Ramon, opportunity means participating in, and contributing to, a team. For more about Ramon, Click here.PRIDE Industries_Internship program_ JoshuaFor Josh, it meant finally getting the chance to prove himself while developing professionally. More about Josh, Click here.

PRIDE Industries Fort Bliss MacAnd for Mynor, it meant being able to provide for his family and secure a future for his young daughters. Click here to learn more about Mynor.

The opportunity we create through employment allows people too often excluded from the workforce to accomplish their personal goals – and more. Employment is essential to an individual’s sense of purpose, dignity, and inclusion. That individual success extends to families, friends and entire communities.

Won’t you join us in creating jobs for people with disabilities? The life that is changed could be your own.

Contact PRIDE Industries at info@prideindustries.com to learn how your business can employ individuals with disabilities.