Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month

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Developmental disabilities can cause challenges in physical movement, learning, language and behavior. These disabilities are often diagnosed in early development and typically impact day-to-day activities and last throughout a person’s lifetime.


Who Is Affected

Developmental disabilities are found among all ages, genders, ethnicities and socioeconomic levels. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in the United States about 15 percent of children between the ages of 3 – 17 years old have one or more developmental disabilities. Developmental disabilities include attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, fragile x syndrome, hearing loss and intellectual disability. For information and resources, click here.


Living with a Developmental Disability

Individuals with developmental disabilities lead full active lives. Access to support services aid in the success and self-sufficiency of persons with disabilities. For more than 50 years, PRIDE Industries has created opportunities for those often excluded from the labor force – people with disabilities. Instead of disability – we see unique abilities.

Through assessments, career planning, training, placement, on-the-job support, follow-up, and case management provided by PRIDE, individuals with disabilities become contributing community members. More than 3,200 individuals with developmental, and other disabilities work at PRIDE. More than 500 individuals with disabilities have also been placed in community employment.


Help Others

We can all play a role in helping individuals with developmental and other disabilities join the workforce. Through employment, people with disabilities gain a sense of purpose, dignity, inclusion, and lead more self-sufficient lives.

How can you help? Consider ways in which opportunities can be created in your business or organization. Not sure how? Contact us. We’d be happy to help! Send an email to: info@prideindustries.com.


Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month 2016

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For 50 years, PRIDE Industries has created opportunities for those often excluded from the labor force – people with disabilities. Instead of disability – we see unique abilities, and we celebrate accomplishments every day.

March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month. Throughout the month, we celebrate the successes of individuals with developmental disabilities – our neighbors, friends, family members and coworkers.

Through employment people with disabilities gain a sense of purpose, dignity, inclusion, and lead more self-sufficient lives. Our programs are customized to provide assessments, career planning, training, placement, on-the-job support, follow-up and case management. We not only employ and support people with developmental disabilities at PRIDE, but have placed more than 500 individuals with disabilities in community employment. Many have been successfully employed with the same local employer for years. To learn more about our services, click here.

We can all play a role in helping individuals with developmental, and other disabilities go to work. How can you help? Consider ways in which opportunities can be created in your business or organization. Not sure how? Contact us. We’d be happy to help! Send an email to: info@prideindustries.com.

A Valuable Part of The Team

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Eric McCullough, 50, is a key member of PRIDE Industries’ custodial team ensuring that the Sacramento International Airport Terminal B is spotless.

It is hard to miss Eric’s enthusiasm and dedication to his job. He has received numerous letters from travelers praising his work and giving him kudos. In the selfie era, Eric has become an unofficial PRIDE celebrity at the airport. Recently, a traveler posted to PRIDE’s Facebook page: “Just met one of your outstanding employees at the Sacramento International Airport. Liked him so much I asked if we could take a selfie… Mr. McCullough totally made my morning!”

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“When doing my job at the airport, I don’t expect people to come up to me and give me recognition. I just let my work speak for itself, says Eric. “I am very serious about that.”

Eric says he is simply doing what he loves. “I enjoy treating the customers with respect; showing them where to go when they get lost, making them feel at home and giving them encouragement.” Although he takes the time to help others and assist where needed, his top priority is accomplishing his tasks. “My main goal is to get my work done in a timely manner.”

Eric has a developmental disability. He was referred to PRIDE at the age of 17,  and he has never wanted to leave the company. Over his 31 years with the company, Eric has held many jobs including a variety of packaging, assembly, and order fulfillment projects. Each job has helped him to develop new skills and improve upon his strengths.

“There are certain things I can’t do as well as other people, but I don’t let that stop me from achieving my goals in life,” says Eric. “I just do the best I can and move on from there.”

Four years ago, Eric decided he was ready for a new challenge. He joined one of PRIDE’s Supported Employment Program groups working at the airport. The Program partners with local businesses to meet their needs while creating community-based jobs for people with disabilities.

Working in the community has been great for Eric. “Eric works full-time, plus all holidays – his attendance is outstanding. He never misses a day,” says Robin Yniguez, a PRIDE Rehabilitation Counselor and Eric’s case manager. “Eric is a very valuable part of the team. He makes us look amazing!”

When asked what motivates him, Eric replies: “The energy in me keeps me going. It keeps me from being bored and gives me an opportunity to do nice things for people that I come in contact with.”

Eric is a humble individual who shares credit for his success. “I am very thankful that God has allowed me to work at the airport and use the talents and the gifts He has given me. If it weren’t for Him, I would not be out there, so I won’t take all the credit. However, I am proud of myself.”

We are proud of Eric, too. We hope his story has inspired you to think about creating opportunities for individuals with disabilities in your business or organization. And, next time you’re traveling through Terminal B in Sacramento, don’t forget to say “hello” to Eric. Better yet, just post your selfie!

Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month

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March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month, a time set aside to bring awareness to developmental disabilities and celebrate the accomplishments of impacted individuals. You may read about highlighted celebrities with developmental disabilities and their achievements.  At PRIDE Industries, we celebrate the successes of individuals with developmental disabilities every day.

Developmental disabilities are a group of conditions due to impairment in physical, learning, language or behavior areas.  According to the Center for Disease Control, approximately one in six children in the U.S. has one or more developmental disabilities or other developmental delays. Developmental disabilities include autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, epilepsy, fragile-X syndrome, and intellectual disabilities.

Forty-nine years ago, a group of parents seeking greater opportunities for their adult children with developmental disabilities founded PRIDE Industries.  Today, PRIDE is a nationally recognized nonprofit social enterprise with an unchanged mission: creating jobs for people with disabilities.

Approximately half of the individuals that PRIDE Industries employs and serves have developmental disabilities. People like Cameron, Mitchell, Donald, Jonathan, Margaret and Joseph, who have the opportunity to work, learn, grow and contribute to their communities. They are not famous, but they are inspiring. We hope you will spend a few minutes reading their stories and consider ways in which you can create opportunities for individuals like them in your business or organization.